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ACC History in Numbers: 1980-2009

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The running winning percentage of every original ACC member in conference games.
The running winning percentage of every original ACC member in conference games.
Yesterday's post featured the formative ACC days. Before the Dark Times. Before the Empire. Today, I'm diving into more recent records featuring three expansions and their importance in strengthening the conference's football presence overall within the national sports media.

The 80's: ACC Finally Wins Another Title


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Team of the Decade: Clemson Tigers
Doormat of the Decade: Wake Forest Demon Deacons
ACC Moment of the Decade: Clemson brought home the ACC's second national title. The 1981 season becomes the benchmark for Clemson fan expectations. Also note that Duke football ceases to exist after Steve Spurrier leaves Duke in 1989. From 1953-1989, Duke football racked up a 112-100-8 conference record. From 1990-2009, Duke football has managed a 20-138 ACC record.

The 90's: Conference is Tomahawk Chopped


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Team of the Decade: Florida State Seminoles
Doormat of the Decade: Duke Blue Devils
ACC Moments of the Decade: From FSU's entry in 1992 to 1995, the Seminoles set an ACC record 29 straight conference victories. The Seminoles only lost 2 conference games throughout the entire 1990's allowing them to secure 8 conference titles in 10 years. Florida State also brought two national titles to the conference alongside Georgia Tech's 1990 National Title. In 1993, Charlie Ward won the ACC its first Heisman Trophy after 36 years of conference play.

The 00's: Modern Expansion Era


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Team of the Decade: Virginia Tech Hokies
Doormat of the Decade: Duke Blue Devils
ACC Moments of the Decade: Expansion is definitely the big story of the 2000's. It has redefined how the conference operates adding in a conference title game, increased football revenues, and a shift from the Tobacco Road political core. Chris Weinke's 2000 Heisman Trophy was also in there. Duke also set the ACC record for consecutive conference losses at 30 before ending the streak in 2003.